Lecture

Gateways and Gophers: implementing a modern BGP monitor
27.07.2015
Speaker: Spiros Thanasoulas, Colorado State University
Date: 27 July 2015 Time: 12:00 – 13:00
Location: "Stelios Orphanoudakis" Seminar Room, FORTH. Heraklion, Crete
Host: Prof. E. Markatos

Abstract:

Visibility to the global routing system is very important to researchers studying routing dynamics and anomalies, as well as commercial entities providing monitoring services. RouteViews (http://www.routeviews.org) and BGPmon (http://www.bgpmon.io) are projects that have been providing global BGP monitoring to researchers and commercial partners for over a decade. The information has enabled ground-breaking research on BGP dynamics with multiple published academic papers and real-time monitoring of routing security incidents such as route hijacks and routing path pathologies. BGPmon's mission is to make routing data easily available to all. The 10-year old implementation of BGPmon, however, has not scaled well to meet users' demands. We have therefore, embarked on a complete rewrite of BGPmon taking advantage of advances in modern languages and distributed databases. In this presentation I will describe the motivation and rationale behind the new architecture in Golang over a distributed database and how the new architecture facilitates easy implementation of services such as detecting BGP route hijacks and much more.

BGPmon's mission is to make routing data easily available to all. The 10-year old implementation of BGPmon, however, has not scaled well to meet users' demands. We have therefore, embarked on a complete rewrite of BGPmon taking advantage of advances in modern languages and distributed databases. In this presentation I will describe the motivation and rationale behind the new architecture in Golang over a distributed database and how the new architecture facilitates easy implementation of services such as detecting BGP route hijacks and much more.

Bio:

Spiros Thanasoulas, an ex-FORTHer who escaped the hectic life of big cities to become a mountain-diver, has been working in computer security for the last 10 years, most of them in the DCS lab. He is now a researcher and the lead software developer of BGPmon at Colorado State University's Netsec group, specilizing in Internet-scale route monitoring and defense against DDoS attacks.
 

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